Posted tagged ‘card collection’

It’s Art, It’s Cards, It’s Creativity, It’s Fabulous

August 27, 2017

Not that I was browsing or anything, but I like to keep my eye on new playing card decks or similar quirky card decks. Many of these are only available from Kickstarter or private sites that I don’t like to buy from. These caught my eye because the cards feature three of my favourite things, illustrations/caricatures of real people, art history, and quotes. It is available at Book Depository and Amazon in the States as well as the publisher’s site, Laurence King Publishing. Well done Mr. King for instigating a wonderful project and making it available to us. I ordered it immediately.

Art Oracles: Creative & Life Inspiration from Great Artists is written by Katya Tylevich and illustrated by Mikkel Sommer and the 50-card deck was just published in August 2017. This is supposed to be a tarot-inspired game, and I’m not sure how that works but even single cards can be inspiring. Here is an example of a card featuring Piet Mondrian with a few choice words.

ArtOraclesSample

I spot Jean-Michel Basquiat on the cover, I’ll have to haul out my copy of Gray’s Anatomy and show him I bought his favourite book. Then I can show him that patella and poem inspired by a tiny illustration in the book. Inspiration lies everywhere!

What I also liked is that the author chose people who were unique artists and did work that was fresh and different. That’s a good quality for igniting and firing up the creativity of others. I often speak of creativity here and on my other blogs because it lives in my mind constantly, and I like a good card deck that fuels creativity and causes me to learn and look things up.

Thank you Katya and Mikkel for stimulating us all with your work; I look forward to exploring your deck. This is an understatement given my joy in discovering this deck.

Oh, they’ve got Charles and Ray Eames too and William Blake naked in his garden…! You guys!!!!

 

 

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Cards with Palette Joy

August 25, 2017

Today’s stimulating projects were to get the plumbing fixed, which went extremely well, and to buy a couple of tubes of acrylic paint, which also went extremely well.

Riding on that wave of extreme satisfaction, I decided to take the plunge and officially buy Pixelmator from the App Store, and while there I bought two  useful programs: Color Palette Converter, and Color Palette from Image. Both programs work great and take the frustration out of getting nice colours into the Apple colour picker. Total cost of the two small programs was about $4, I was so pleased.

Here is a little screen shot of a card deck cover and the colour palette I generated from it, now available in the Apple colour picker for any program that uses it.

ColourPalette_Saints

The Colour Palette from Image program allows up to 20 colours, certainly adequate for most purposes. You can change the gamma on it to subdue the shades or select more or less colours.

So there you go, yet another neat thing you can do with your cards. Create stationery with the colours of your favourite card, create a web site, sew some clothes in those colours, or simply look at the colours in a preview window and sigh dreamily, thinking of sewing handbags with hand painted swooshes in that blue colour on the bottom right.

Yikes, way too stimulating for one day.

New Tarot Cupboards

March 28, 2017

I’m into my tenth day of trying to organize my bedroom. I have one tiny half rack I’m using for clothes in the walk-in closet, and the rest is all craft, art supplies and doll or dollhouse stuff. Yeah, I’ve got MY priorities straight.

These are flat-pack pantries or wardrobes. These are fairly light and hold a lot with the extra wire racks I put on the shelves. I had one extra shelf cut for each cupboard and still they are filled up.

JJ_TarotCupboards

Now I have to organize and put away the mess at the end of my bed. I have ordered a nice wooden blanket box in a “chocolate cherry” stain but that won’t be here for weeks. My quilts are reeking of plastic after being stored for 2 years or so in a Rubbermaid plastic bin. Never again. I’ve washed the ones I can, but the quilt tops can’t be washed so I’ll try to air them out in other ways.

I can actually get to my decks now and I found I had room to display my tarot bags facing toward the front—so pretty. I JUST had room for all the boxes too. While reorganizing the decks, I got rid of two so I’m still under 400 at 399 decks. I couldn’t fit my postcard collection in the cupboards, so they’ve gone into the closet for now. I wondered while looking at some of these decks why I bought them but I think the Internet has a lot to do with fuelling the purchase of stuff.

My next task is to enter my four new decks in my database. I received the 72 Names of God deck by Orna Ben-Shoshan yesterday and I really love it, it has such depth in information and artwork.

The Okanagan Oracle

March 7, 2017

I was really delighted when I saw the Okanagan Oracle cards by Suzy Coyote as I was born in the Okanagan, and it took me decades to get back to British Columbia after living in Ontario.

OkanaganOracle

There are some really gorgeous cards in this deck, such beautiful scenes of nature and lake and sea, flowers, vineyard, objects, sculptures, and buildings. Really, I am looking forward to exploring these and using them on the blog. They don’t come with a booklet but there are subtly printed keywords on each card in this 58-card deck.

I don’t think I’ve seen such a lovely mixture of scenes in any card deck. Naturally, I felt I should order them. apart from supporting a Canadian artist, I find it impressive when people push through and finish and publish decks. It’s not as easy as it looks.

I am often tempted by card decks but rarely buy many these days. These latest four decks have pushed me past the 400 mark in my deck collection, but I have such a passion for cards and art, and there is always an artist like Suzy with a fresh eye to show things that are important to them, influencing and creating in the world.

It’s like gold! Gold with chocolate sprinkles.

Waiting for Winter 72 Times

March 2, 2017

There are some rather oppressive looking clouds over the sea right now. Rain today and it’s still cold so I’m waiting for winter to go.  And waiting and waiting and waiting…

While contemplating this weather yesterday, I took a notion to buy a card deck that I’ve wanted for some time. Actually, I’ve wanted three of Orna Ben-Shoshan’s decks but I had to pick only one — oh no, not that! I picked the 72 Names Cards.

72namescards_2

This was bought as a companion deck to Yehuda Berg’s book  The 72 Names of God which I’ve had for many years. It has needed a visual companion for an equally long time, so now it will have one.

I also have a book on Hebrew calligraphy so perhaps I’ll fire up my Pilot Parallel pen and do some calligraphy with these? I find it frustrating to be hampered by pain right now, but I am continuing the vegan eating plan and gradually feeling better. It will take months but I am confident that I’m giving my body the ability to repair itself.

72names_sample

We’ve had several walks along the sea front in the past two weeks, but today amid the wind and gloom, it is a day for dreaming of names and colour and the wisdom of millennia.

Database in the Golden World

December 7, 2016

“…fleet the time carelessly as they did in the golden world.” [Shakespeare, As You Like It]

This week while looking through one of my art history books, I came across a leopard that Kat Black had used in her collaged Golden Tarot on the High Priestess card. I have a number of books on frescoes, illuminated manuscripts, and Sienese painting and every now and then recognize snippets from this deck.  It made me want to discuss the deck.

goldentarot

I started the original thread for this deck on a forum under the name “darwinia” which I used at the time. Kat sent me a signed card when I bought the deck to thank me for that, which was nice.

goldentarot_sign

I remember being incensed at the derogatory review that K. Frank Jensen wrote about this deck. He was disparaging about the pretty deck as a mere clone of the Rider-Waite, gussied up for the fans. I find many old-time tarot people can be dismissive of themed decks, not even giving them a chance. One fellow whom I e-mailed made fun of me for recommending the Pagan Cats Tarot when it was published, but it’s a good deck, and has some depth, despite the sound of the cheesy theme name. I prefer people who work with a deck for some months to do reviews.

Yes, it’s pretty but these images really pull you into the archetype, pull you into the reflection of the human condition. I laud Kat’s depth of experience and wisdom to visualize that.

goldentarotback

I respect the deck because of the art and Kat Black’s mastery of collage is very good in comparison to other collage decks. It’s an easy technique but not easy to compose seamlessly from disparate references. She did a great job. Over time, I have come to be wary of collaged decks and prefer hand drawn illustrated decks, but this holds up for me.

I felt a bit sad for several years because after Kat published the Touchstone Tarot I saw her deriding someone on a forum for some reason, long forgotten. Ah, the fallen hero. Imagine though, what it’s like to work for your own fun and amusement, to know the work intimately from all your solitary hours of work, and then to get a huge amount of attention and accolades, from tarot celebrities as well as regular folk, and to be a professionally published author. The Ego, ever ready to convince you of your greatness, and one day you make a remark…certainly we’ve all been there. People are humans, not heroes, despite our projections.

Over time I can pull this deck out and feel my fondness for it, the attraction of the Medieval landscape quietly inhabits my mind. It reminds me a lot of the Grail Tarot, with artwork by Giovanni Caselli, another favourite of mine. Here are four cards that are beautifully done.

goldentarot_4

I never bought the Touchstone Tarot because Kat changed the head on a painting depicting Elizabeth I as a young girl; I couldn’t bear to look at that card as I adore the original painting. I also felt the deck was a bit same-y after the Golden Tarot, although she used artwork from a later period. Such is the subjectivity of art and deck publishing.

The Golden Tarot definitely has staying power, and I shall use it for a bit, re-familiarize myself with the deck and generally enjoy it, a personal favourite. I saw recent comments online about newer editions having glossy lamination, whereas this deck, the original publication, has matte lamination which beautifully complements the Medieval/Early Renaissance time period. Still, the fact that it’s in-print says a lot about the spirit of the deck and its author.

Good on you Kat.

Database in Medieval Blue

November 15, 2016

medievaltarot

Guido Zibordi Marchesi illustrated the Medieval Tarot that I am discussing today, as well as the Giotto Tarot, one of my first and favourite decks, and the Bruegel Tarot which illustrates many of the Netherlandish Proverbs. The only deck of his that I don’t have is the Michelangelo Tarot.

He does beautiful architectural illustrations and models as well as paintings, and you can see how meticulous in detail and research he is by viewing his biography and a list of his various exhibits. These sites are in Italian but you can use Google Translate to get the gist of them. He is a real master of words and art, no wonder he is one of my favourite Lo Scarabeo illustrators.

http://www.guidozibordimarchesi.it/biografia/

http://www.guidozibordimarchesi.it/mostre/

For me, I look at an artist like this, and it drives me to purchase decks that an artist has spent some time researching and creating. Lo Scarabeo decks usually excel at this, I have great respect for that attitude.

What really attracted me to the deck was the blue skies and backgrounds, so reminiscent of illuminated manuscripts which are an interest of mine. Ultramarine in those days was made from lapis lazuli, and Guido Zibordi Marchesi captures that feel of the Middle Ages in these colours. This deck was published in 2007 and still holds up for me, a gem of people and colour, initiating a grand old browse through my many books about illuminated manuscripts.

medievaltarot_samples

The Tower card is very like castles depicted in illuminated manuscripts, particularly the castle of the Duc Jean de Berry in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry where his castle is seen on the calendar for September.

tresrichesberry_september

You can see more examples from the book here.

As examples, two other 15th century manuscripts that have the style and colours that perhaps inspired this deck are The Bedford Hours, made for John, Duke of Bedford, and the Bouquechardière Chronicle by Jean de Courcy, also known as Chronique de la Bouquechardière.

The descriptions for the deck are priceless:

“A medieval inspiration: The Art of Memory is one of the greatest secrets handed down by alchemists and medieval sorcerers. The later Middle Ages have a brighter aspect, marked by the rebirth of the arts, philosophy, and sciences. It is the second period that inspired Guido Zibordi to paint the Medieval Tarot. These 78 cards, in fact, recall the magnificence of the princely courts and pastimes of the courtiers, the battles of the Crusades, the solitary study of philosophers and discussions of theologians, the daily work and beliefs of the common people.

This is not, however, a commemorative or historical deck. On the contrary, the Medieval Tarot contains the spirit of Ars memorandi, a memory system passed down in the schools aimed at developing intellectual qualities and spiritual virtues. The Ars memorandi, which attributed an exemplary value to images, without a doubt traces the first Tarot decks back to its origin, a “wordless book” that taught the rules of true nobility, that of the intellect and soul.

Today like in the past, simple yet profound rules let each individual follow a path of improvement and reach the top of an invisible ladder uniting the material world with the spiritual dimension.”

knightswords_medieval

One of the reasons I’ve been keen on decks for 16 years is the spiritual dimension described above, the ideal of archetype and Medieval pageantry, lush, saturated colour steeped in history, and the human world absorbing and reflecting it.

How could you resist the courtly ideal of it all?