Today’s Interesting Fact #43.2

FACT: If there is a table surface available, a plant will end up there, as well as Dave and his sheep, tarot boxes, books, and cards, William Clark my portable GPS, and paint chips. Grey paint chips for the hall in which I am going to paint my white tree.

Table_Dave

I bought three more pots and plants for the living room and dining room and I cleared the table off. We actually had lunch there yesterday. Zounds, such excitement. Pictures to hang and pillows to make, which means I have to tackle the three cartons of fabric and sort and put them away. We took four pictures to the framer to have them reframed, new windows have gone into three rooms, and I’ve lost count but I think we unpacked 19 boxes of stuff in the last two weeks.

I also packed three boxes of ornaments, a picture, a mirror, a cork board,  and about seven bags of books to go to the thrift shop.

I – THE MAGICIAN – FOX

Ah Magus, thanks for dropping by today. I am exhausted and could use some of your energy.

Magician_AnTotem

This reminds me of the Thornton W. Burgess book about Danny Meadow Mouse—Reddy Fox was always trying to hear Danny Meadow Mouse scooting under the snow so he could pounce on him and eat him. And by golly here he is Reddy on The Magician in the Animal Totem Tarot, along with an appropriate figure.

The spouse and I have vowed to take a proper break this holiday Monday in order to rest. Fox says today “There is an undercurrent of abundance that flows through everything and everyone. But sometimes you have to stop doing what you are doing in order to truly tap into the magic of what is around you.”

So, expand the senses today, the real magic happens in the unseen. Stop talking, take a rest, be quiet and listen, like the fox listening for scurrying creatures under the snow.

 

 

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4 Comments on “Today’s Interesting Fact #43.2”


  1. Seeing as you’re a reader of Thornton Burgess’s books … I live on property where he apparently used to come for a summer retreat for several years. It’s mentioned in several places in our local history book, but the T.B. Society and Burgess’s biographer have no information about it.
    If you’re interested at all, check out the first few posts on my blog, which explain a little more: http://goldengrainfarm.blogspot.com.
    The house that’s here now isn’t the same one that Burgess stayed in, but there are wetlands all around, close, and I often think of Burgess being here, inspired by the waterfowl and other wildlife, to write some of his children’s stories.

    • JJ Says:

      I am delighted you came by to mention this Kathy!!! I read the entries on your blog and followed one link and now have the book “Nature’s Ambassador” about the life of Burgess on my wish list.

      His books were the ones my Mom read to me at bedtime and some of the first books I read as a child. Paddy the Beaver is the oldest book of his I have, it belonged to my oldest sister who is in her 70s now. I only have about 7 of his titles but they are treasures, and certainly influenced me along with Gerald Durrell in my love of animals.

      So many people haven’t heard of him but it’s good to know his influence carries on.

  2. mooninfog Says:

    Ha! Laughing at “three boxes of ornaments, a picture, a mirror, a cork board, and about seven bags of books to go to the thrift shop” because that’s the story of my life. HOW IS IT that one assiduously sorts through everything in preparation for a big move and yet still ends up carting jelly jars and the like cross-continent?

    • JJ Says:

      I was warned about this from people who had done big moves and still I ended up with stuff.

      Some of the books no one wanted so they had to go in recycle. Blah. One book shop had hundreds of Danielle Steel books but she didn’t want Paul Gallico’s “The Literary Cat”–zounds. It went to the thrift shop where hopefully someone will leap on it and take it home.


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