The Day of Joy and Ultramarine

Daily Draw July 7th, 2012

24 – HERZ (Heart)

My first draw with the Judith Bärtschi Lenormand.

Now, my German is non-existent but I was pleased that while reading the book, I could get some of this. This is Mary, the Mother of Jesus wearing her classic ultramarine blue garb. There is something about this reminding Judith of the Lourdes Madonna and sentimentality. The lily is classically associated with Mary, which you can see depicted on her dress, and the lotus at the bottom seems to stand for fertility and a synthesis with the Indian goddess Lakshmi.

There is a lot more about mature love, harmony, optimism, the joy of life, and the seat of the soul and perception and impulses. It is beyond any online translators and I don’t have a German dictionary.

I do generally think of the Heart in Lenormand as a card of joy. I suppose the classic fortune-telling way would be to speak of weddings and flowers, but I get an inkling of sacredness with this, and the deities and their attendant flowers and joy, and tuning into inner perception and joy.

Oh, look what happened in Ultramarineland, this paperback dictionary was urged upon me by Lakshmi. Unfortunately Lakshmi was not forthcoming with the dosh for the $47 Collins German/English dictionary but this should do me.

 

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About JJ

Eccentric erminois dweller.
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8 Responses to The Day of Joy and Ultramarine

  1. Jason says:

    I enjoyed your musings on this card. Not having read the book, I hadn’t picked up on it being Mary. In fact, I’d thought it was an Indian figure.

    I haven’t done any readings with this deck yet, just browsed through the cards and their whimsical yet appropriate images.

    • woley says:

      Well, there is something about a synthesis with Lakshmi in the write-up so you weren’t far off.

      I am impressed with her different take on Lenormand in the book–it is frustrating not to get the whole gist of it. At the end of each write-up she has a “Bärtschi Bonmot” which is her own spin on things. I love that, but it has been laborious to get the gist of those too.

      The thing about basic translation is that you miss the humour and the word play of the author.

      We could be like Joseph Campbell and teach ourselves German so we can read such things in the original. After Judith Bärtschi we could read Freud!

      • Jason says:

        I’m not a fan of Campbell. I had to study the hero’s journey when I took some screenwriting classes, and found it a total snooze. Every author and teacher seemed to be teaching how to plot (a winning!) movie through the use of the hero’s journey as a basis.

        Then it caught on in the tarot world, and every time I would try to read a book or article on how the tarot shows the hero’s journey, my eyes would glaze over. I know it works for some people, but I’m not one of them.

        However, I didn’t know he taught himself German. I’ve sometimes wanted to read German or French, just to access all the Lenormand materials available in those languages. My old Spanish skills haven’t been too helpful in this venue. 🙂

        Freud… sometimes a Snake is just a snake? 😀

  2. woley says:

    Hahaha–you and I agree on the snake issue. I find Campbell’s writing to be a snooze fest as well. Every tarot book that cites the Hero’s Journey thing makes me want to clench my teeth. It is one of the most distasteful and arbitrary add-ons in tarot.

    He revered James Joyce who is one of the most over-rated authors.

    However, Campbell did have an interesting life and I recommend the biography “Joseph Campbell: A Fire in the Mind” by Stephen and Robin Larsen.

  3. ironwing says:

    The “Hero’s Journey” fad never did much for me. Maybe too male oriented…definitely overdone and corporatized.
    Anyway, I can definitely see a Mary/Lakshmi connection in this card. You can find a similar West/East similarity in the Mexican Virgin of Guadalupe and the Indian Green Tara.

    • woley says:

      I thought at first that it was Our lady of Guadalupe until I did a rudimentary translation of the book.

      I think it’s Rachel Pollack who has morphed it into “The Fool’s Journey”–same diff. I feel similarly about relating and adding up numbers and card order in people’s personalized associations of numerology. It has become a cult, I avoid it.

      Hey, the Tarot of Corporatism coming to stores just in time for Christmas! There’s a pun there somewhere Lorena.

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